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Golestan Palace: Recent News

Posted on May, 2, 2013
Contributed to WCHV by Reza Kamali
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While the Golestan Palace awaits recognition and being listed by UNESCO on the World’s Cultural Heritage list, the area in the vicinity and close proximity to the palace is now under construction.  These few buildings that are being built in the close vicinity of the Golestan Palace are receiving building permits from the city of Tehran.  It is very difficult to understand the timing of these recent developments and the fact that it coincides with UNESCO’s reviews.

A few days ago one of the members of the Islamic parliament by the name of Bijan Nobavaeh told the reporters that many high ranking members of the parliament have connections and are influencing the construction projects.  He also told the reporters that UNESCO has warned the Iranian Government that if these new buildings are built in the very close vicinity of the Golestan Palace, the listing by UNESCO could be jeopardized.

Golestan Palace is the latest Cultural heritage site in Iran which is considered endangered, similar to a number of other sites. These deteriorations have resulted in these sites not being recognized and listed on the UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage sites list.

Golestān Palace pronounced “Kakheh Golestān” (The Rose Garden Palace) was built during the reign of Tahmasp I of the Safavid dynasty (1502–1736), and was later renovated by Karim Khan Zand (r. 1750-1779). When  Agha Mohamd Khan Qajar (1742–1797) chose Tehran as his capital, the Court and Golestan Palace became the official residence of the royal Qajar family. During the Pahlavi era (1925–1979), the last dynasty in Iran, before the Iranian revolution,  Golestan Palace was used for formal royal receptions and the Pahlavi dynasty built their own palace at Niavaran. A major part of the Golestan Palace is now a museum open to the public.

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